Question: What Will Happen In 100 Trillion Years?

What is 1000000000 years called?

The metric prefix giga indicates 1,000,000,000 times the base unit.

Its symbol is G.

One billion years may be called an eon in astronomy or geology….1000000000CardinalOne billion (short scale) One thousand million, or one milliard (long scale)OrdinalOne billionth (short scale)Factorization29 · 598 more rows.

What is one billion years called?

one billion yearsOne billion yearsAEONOne billion yearsEON39 more rows

Where does space end?

No, they don’t believe there’s an end to space. However, we can only see a certain volume of all that’s out there. Since the universe is 13.8 billion years old, light from a galaxy more than 13.8 billion light-years away hasn’t had time to reach us yet, so we have no way of knowing such a galaxy exists.

What will happen in the year 3000?

By the year 3000, global warming would be more than a hot topic — the West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, and global sea levels would rise by about 13 feet (4 meters), according to a new study.

Will humans go extinct?

The short answer is yes. The fossil record shows everything goes extinct, eventually. Almost all species that ever lived, over 99.9%, are extinct. … Humans are inevitably heading for extinction.

What will happen in 100 trillion years from now?

And then one day, the last star will use up the last of its hydrogen fuel, become a red giant and then fade away to a white dwarf. … And so, in about 100 trillion years from now, every star in the Universe, large and small, will be a black dwarf.

What would happen in 1 trillion years?

1 Trillion Years Into The Future Estimated time the end of the Universe via the Big Crunch, assuming a “closed” model. … Finally, all the black holes in the universe will merge into one singular black hole containing all the matter in the universe, which it would then devour the universe, including itself.

What will happen in 1 billion years?

BLUE PLANET. The evaporation of water into the space surrounding Earth will mark the final gasp of any life on the planet. This will occur about 2.5 billion years from now, but the oceans themselves could be mostly gone by 1 billion years into the future — a mere blink of the eye in cosmic terms.

What will happen in 5 billion years?

Five billion years from now, the sun will have grown into a red giant star, more than 100 times larger than its current size. … During our sun’s metamorphosis from ordinary star to red giant to white dwarf, both Mercury and Venus – worlds inside Earth’s orbit – will be engulfed and destroyed. Earth won’t be engulfed.

Will our universe end?

Unfortunately, the discovery of dark energy dealt the Big Crunch a deathblow, since it suggests the universe will expand forever. Unless it turns out dark energy can change its nature dramatically, the Big Crunch seems an unlikely way for the universe to end.

Is there life on Venus?

With extreme surface temperatures reaching nearly 735 K (462 °C; 863 °F) and an atmospheric pressure 90 times that of Earth, the conditions on Venus make water-based life as we know it unlikely on the surface of the planet.

How will the earth die?

The most probable fate of the planet is absorption by the Sun in about 7.5 billion years, after the star has entered the red giant phase and expanded beyond the planet’s current orbit.

What is higher than a trillion?

After a billion, of course, is trillion. Then comes quadrillion, quintrillion, sextillion, septillion, octillion, nonillion, and decillion. One of my favorite challenges is to have my math class continue to count by “illions” as far as they can.

What will happen in 2050?

Higher water levels, more powerful tropical storms, and increased energy use across the globe will lead to widespread power outages. In the US, the effects will be worst in crowded, northeastern cities like New York and Philadelphia. By 2050, up to 50% more people there will likely be temporarily without power.

Who created the universe?

God did not create the universe, the man who is arguably Britain’s most famous living scientist says in a forthcoming book. In the new work, The Grand Design, Professor Stephen Hawking argues that the Big Bang, rather than occurring following the intervention of a divine being, was inevitable due to the law of gravity.